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Redis

Redis on NAIS is run without disk/storage. This means that if a Redis instance is restarted due to something like maintenance, the data will be lost. In other words, do not store data here that you cannot afford to lose.

It's also possible to password protect the Redis instance with some configuration.

How to

Redis can be run as a normal NAIS application. This means that you can only run single instances that are not scalable; increasing replicas will only start new databases that are not synced. Contact @Kyrre.Havik.Eriksen if you need High Availability-Redis.

Example deployments

An example Redis setup looks like this:

---
apiVersion: "nais.io/v1alpha1"
kind: "Application"
metadata:
  labels:
    team: ${teamname}
  name: ${appname}
  namespace: ${teamname}
spec:
  image: redis:<latest-docker-tag> # or a custom Redis-image
  port: 6379
  replicas: # A single Redis-app doesn't scale
    min: 1
    max: 1 # More replicas doesn't sync
  resources: # you need to monitor the resource usage yourself
    limits:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
    requests:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
  service:
    port: 6379
    protocol: redis
  accessPolicy: # for GCP
    inbound:
      rules:
        - application: ${inbound-app}
---
apiVersion: "nais.io/v1alpha1"
kind: "Application"
metadata:
  labels:
    team: ${teamname}
  name: ${appname}
  namespace: ${teamname}
spec:
  image: redis:<latest-docker-tag> # or a custom Redis-image
  port: 6379
  replicas: # A single Redis-app doesn't scale
    min: 1
    max: 1 # More replicas doesn't sync
  resources: # you need to monitor the resource usage yourself
    limits:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
    requests:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
  service:
    port: 6379
    protocol: redis
  accessPolicy: # for GCP
    inbound:
      rules:
        - application: ${appname}-redisexporter
---
apiVersion: "nais.io/v1alpha1"
kind: "Application"
metadata:
  labels:
    team: ${teamname}
  name: ${appname}-redisexporter
  namespace: ${teamname}
spec:
  image: oliver006/redis_exporter:<latest-docker>
  port: 9121
  prometheus:
    enabled: true
  replicas:
    min: 1
    max: 1
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 100Mi
    requests:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 100Mi
  liveness:
    path: /health
  accessPolicy: # for GCP
    outbound:
      rules:
        - application: ${appname}
  env:
    - name: REDIS_ADDR
      value: ${appname}:6379
    - name: REDIS_EXPORTER_LOG_FORMAT
      value: json
---
apiVersion: "nais.io/v1alpha1"
kind: "Application"
metadata:
  labels:
    team: ${teamname}
  name: ${appname}
  namespace: ${teamname}
spec:
  image: bitnami/redis:<latest-docker-tag> # or a custom Redis-image
  port: 6379
  replicas: # A single Redis-app doesn't scale
    min: 1
    max: 1 # More replicas doesn't sync
  resources: # you need to monitor the resource usage yourself
    limits:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
    requests:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 128Mi
  service:
    port: 6379
    protocol: redis
  accessPolicy: # for GCP
    inbound:
      rules:
        - application: ${appname}-redisexporter
  envFrom:
    - secret: ${secret-name} 
---
apiVersion: "nais.io/v1alpha1"
kind: "Application"
metadata:
  labels:
    team: ${teamname}
  name: ${appname}-redisexporter
  namespace: ${teamname}
spec:
  image: oliver006/redis_exporter:<latest-docker>
  port: 9121
  prometheus:
    enabled: true
  replicas:
    min: 1
    max: 1
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 100Mi
    requests:
      cpu: 100m
      memory: 100Mi
  liveness:
    path: /health
  accessPolicy: # for GCP
    outbound:
      rules:
        - application: ${appname}
  env:
    - name: REDIS_ADDR
      value: ${appname}:6379
    - name: REDIS_EXPORTER_LOG_FORMAT
      value: json
  envFrom:
    - secret: ${secret-name}

Then, running kubectl apply -f <redis-config>.yaml will start up a Redis instance. Or deploy it with nais/deploy.

Success

Check out hub.docker.com for latest Redis version

For any applications that wishes to communicate with the Redis instance, it is recommended to add the following environment variable to the applications' nais.yaml files:

env:
  - name: REDIS_HOST
    value: ${appname}.${namespace}.svc.nais.local

GCP

If on GCP, the host name is slightly different:

env:
  - name: REDIS_HOST
    value: ${appname}.${namespace}.svc.cluster.local

Remember to set up access policies for your Redis instance as well:

accessPolicy:
  inbound:
    rules:
      - application: ${inbound-appname}

And the equivalent outbound policy for any apps that should be able to connect to the redis instance:

accessPolicy:
  outbound:
    rules:
      - application: ${redis-appname}

Redis metrics

If you want metrics from a Redis instance running on NAIS, a separate exporter must also be run. An example nais.yaml for the simplest version of such an exporter is found above. NAIS has also made a dashboard that everyone can use. The only caveat is that the exporter application needs to end its name with redisexporter in the configuration. The dashboard is called Redis exporters. The dashboard sorts by addr, enabling a single exporter to scrape several Redis instances.

Info

See the redis-with-metrics.yaml example in examples above for setting up a configuration with the metrics exporter.

Success

Check out hub.docker.com for latest Redis metrics exporter version

Secure Redis

If you need to password protect your Redis instance, the easiest way to do this is to use Kubernetes secrets and mount them to your container, however you will also have to use a different Redis baseimage from Bitnami.

Success

Check out hub.docker.com for latest Bitnami Redis version

Start by creating a Kubernetes secret:

kubectl create secret generic ${secret-name} \
    --from-literal=${key}=${value}

For example:

kubectl create secret generic redis-password \
    --from-literal=REDIS_PASSWORD=$(date +%s | sha256sum | base64 | head -c 32)

Now that you have a secret in Kubernetes (use kubectl describe secret redis-password to look at it), all you have to do left is to mount it.

Then you should also mount it to any applications that connects to the Redis instance. This is done by adding the following to your nais.yaml.

spec:
  envFrom:
    - secret: redis-password

Info

See the redis-secure.yaml example in the examples above for setting up Redis with a password from the secret you just created.

Code examples

We are not application developers, so please help us out by expanding with examples!

Redis cache in Spring Boot

Add the following to the Spring Boot application's application.yaml to enable Spring to use Redis as cache.

session:
  store-type: redis
redis:
  host: ${REDIS_HOST}
  port: 6379